Seasonal allergies could be related to food allergies

By: Matt McGovern Email
By: Matt McGovern Email

Its called "oral allergy syndrome," and one doctor says nearly half of seasonal allergy sufferers have it.

The type of pollen you're allergic to, tree, grass or ragweed, usually determines which fruits you'll react to, but almost any fresh fruit can cause one.

(NBC) - Are you sneezing, sniffing, and itching more than usual?People who suffer from seasonal allergies are hurting this time of year, but those sniffles and sneezes can also be related to food allergies.

Signs of spring are everywhere, but that's not always a pleasant thing for some, like Paolo Bisante. He's one of many people who suffer from seasonal allergies.

His mouth and throat also got itchy eating some fresh fruit, but it wasn't until Paolo started seeing doctor Mah-Nahve Singla at Union Memorial for his allergies that he found out the two are related.

Its called "oral allergy syndrome," and Doctor Singla says nearly half of seasonal allergy sufferers have it. The type of pollen you're allergic to, tree, grass or ragweed, usually determines which fruits you'll react to, but almost any fresh fruit can cause one.

Luckily, its usually very mild. Most people can even continue to eat the fruit, but for a few reactions can be serious.

Paolo has been getting allergy shots for a year now, and says he feels much better. They've alleviated his seasonal allergies and he's back to eating the fruit he loves.

Dr. Singla says seasonal allergies usually peak around late April, but due to colder weather in some areas, the peak might not be until mid-May.


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