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United States seeing surge of migrants

U.S. border officials are inundated by a surge of migrants coming from Mexico, prompting some to question if Mexican nationals have access to vaccines once they arrive.
Published: Mar. 12, 2021 at 12:25 AM CST
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LAREDO, Tex. (KGNS) - U.S. border officials are inundated by a surge of migrants coming from Mexico, prompting some to question if Mexican nationals have access to vaccines once they arrive.

City officials claim otherwise.

“Yes, they are being tested,” said Chief Guillermo Heard. “There has only been one migrant testing positive and that migrant has been treated.”

Despite the images circulating showing large groups of undocumented immigrants illegally crossing into the U.S., local officials insist they are following protocol, separating the concept of being tested and those getting vaccinated.

“Anyone who is residing in the U.S. is entitled to receive the vaccines.”

As of January, the CDC requires all travelers into the U.S. to provide a negative COVID-19 test within three days of departure. However, we’re looking at a record surge at the southern border of illegal crossings.

The Rio Grande Valley area alone is now seeing at least a thousand migrants per day, many of them unaccompanied children.

“The border is not open. Going forward, we will continue to look for ways to provide legal avenues in the region for people needing protection, while we continue to enforce our laws.”

The surge is driven by the pandemic, two hurricanes in Central America, and the perceived relaxation of immigration rules in the U.S.

Precise numbers here at home are not clear.

“Holding Institute, the ones that are currently taking the lead during these efforts. I believe they have been responsible. I’t something where they’re in current communication with us.”

Local health authorities say we should focus on following the previous mandates in place before worrying about the threat of non-essential travelers.

“If the migrants are here for an extended amount of time, vaccines would be provided to them, but as they are traveling to see their family members the likelihood of them being here for 24 to 36 hours is vey low,” said Richard Chamberlain.

The White House has announced plans to restart the Central American minors program ended by the Trump administration, and it’s requesting $4 billion for northern triangle countries Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, which is where a large portion of the migrants that are traveling into the U.S.

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